Hydrangea

Hydrangea is a classic, heirloom wedding flower that has been enjoying a comeback in popularity.  It is a mass of small

Hydrangea

Hydrangea

flat petaled flowers on one stem.  The flower heads are so massive, 4 together are already a complete bouquet.

Colors available in Hydrangea:

Hydrangea come in a wide range of colors, most of them pastel or antique looking.  Common shades are blues, purples, whites, pinks and greens.

Glowing Blue Hydrangea

Glowing Blue Hydrangea

Hydrangea’s use in weddings:

Hydrangea can be used in every kind of wedding flower arrangement.  It adds soft texture to bride’s and bridesmaids bouquets, and provides an eye-catching showy mass in centerpieces and larger arrangements.  Smaller clusters of the tiny flowers can be broken off from the main flower head and, with wire and tape, be used as accents or filler for boutonnieres and corsages.

Classic, elegant wedding bouquet of roses and hydrangea

Classic, elegant wedding bouquet of roses and hydrangea

Hydrangea is very useful in wedding flower arrangements also because of it’s ability to fill in space and “cover up”.  For example, if there is a bit of tape, or plastic or something that you want to hide, a hydrangea blossom will do the trick.  Hydrangeas sit atop very sturdy, woody stems and can last a long time outside of water.  They are also beautiful dried, so if you want a bouquet you can preserve and keep, hydrangea is a good choice.

What to pair hydrangea with:

Hydrangeas are easy to get along with.  They go well with roses,

The flowers in this bouquet have been placed among the florets of the hydrange -which serves as a backdrop to the warm bright flowers

The flowers in this bouquet have been placed among the florets of the hydrange -which serves as a backdrop to the warm bright flowers

tulips, lilies, peonies -pretty much everything.  Hydrangeas are a really popular choice for monochromatic bouquets and arrangements (all one color).  They are also useful in contributing hard-to-find-colors like true blue and green.

Design tip: try creating a compact, low bunch of hydrangeas with a few flowering branches or other spiking element emerging from them.

Hydrangea Season and sources:

Hydrangeas are available most of the year, but are most plentiful in early spring.  Hydrangeas can be grown in gardens in the more northerly states of the USA.

price level:

$5-$15/stem